Saturday, July 19, 2014

days that used to be

Back to the bookbench. So, after spending all that time doing all the work on the front (a lot more work than I'd anticipated as it just seemed to grow and grow and grow) I had to do it all again on the back.
Now, because I'm terrible at updating (or not updating?) projects, I just leaving them hanging midway like some cliff-hanger and annoyingly you never get to see the final episode, I thought I'd post the end result of my bookbench. Well, this isn't quite the end result, this the penultimate stage. So there's still scope for me to leave him hanging off that cliff.
These two photos, above and below, are a couple of moments that I like. Apologies for the quality of the photos. I took them all on my iPhone and have still not got to grips with the camera.
The drawing on the back of my bookbench was the tidier version of the one at the top of this post. Our girl has interrupted her reading to tidy up - by shoving everything under or behind the sofa.
And so, my bench also came with instructions (below). All the objects that you could see on the front of the bench can been found on the back, tucked under cushions, etc. You've got to search for them. Yes, I really did draw it ALL again. I like to bring that interactive element to drawings. It was what rocked my world, about books and illustrations, when I was a kid.
My bench is now actually out on display, with the 49 others, in London. There is a trail and map so you can go and see them all. Mine is on the Greenwich part of the trail in this churchyard. I've been told that the church backs onto a couple of schools, and they have already planned school visits to the bench. I hope the kids have fun finding all of the objects and stuff and nonsense.
I'll post the final stage soon; which was adding a little colour, and then the most nerve-racking bit of all adding the varnish. Until that point I had no idea how the marker pens would react to hard core varnish/resin. Would all that work bleed once the varnish hit it? Would the whole drawing be ruined? 
DUN DUN DUNNNNN!!!!
 
PS, if anyone is in London, and visits the bookbench, please take a photo of yourself there. I'd love to see it. Send it to me.

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8 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

The bench looks really nice. Wish I could stop by and get a picture of myself sitting on it... but that would mean a trip halfway around the world!

12:18 PM  
Blogger dinahmow said...

It doesn't matter what you draw, you always add that AJ flare.
Wish I could have been in London...

7:45 PM  
Blogger eSeN said...

I love the bench. I'm jealous of all the Londoners who get to see it whenever they want!

5:36 AM  
Blogger Polly Birchall said...

Your work is extraordinary as is your imagination

8:41 AM  
Blogger Clare Willcocks said...

This is fantastic! Love all the little details. Like you, I used to love books with intricate little pictures and hidden surprises. I was up in London last week (from Devon), I wish I had known to look out for these benches!

7:49 PM  
Blogger Janna said...

I love your bench! I didn't get a chance to see it in person during my brief stopover in London, but I've searched high and low on the photos for where you put the Rubik's Cube on the back of the book..... Maybe it's in the basket? Or behind the cushion? Or under the cat? Or, maybe I'll be able to find it in the color version?? Otherwise, I hope you'll tell us!

10:50 PM  
Blogger andrea joseph's sketchblog said...

Thank you guys. Still haven't got to London to see it myself, yet!

Janna, ha! No, I shan't be telling. The Rubik's cube is the trickiest thing to find, it's true. And, it was the one thing I forgot to add to the back. I only realised when I did a final checklist. So, I had to be very creative tucking it into the picture.

Cheers, my dears!

2:28 PM  
Blogger Purplepaint's Muse said...

oh how awesome!!! I always loved those hidden object books!!! I'm guessing the varnish went on okay with no bleeding? :)

11:53 PM  

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