Tuesday, July 27, 2010

how to draw a shoe

As promised, here is the second method I use, when it comes to drawing shoes. This, it has to be said, is my favourite method of all. And, I use it not only for drawings shoes but for most of the still life drawings that I make. In fact, this is probably how about 90% of them were created. A friend of mine says it's cheating, but I don't think so. This method means that everything I draw is the actual size of the object. Plus, for me, it brings the object and the drawing closer together. I feel that the object really becomes a part of the drawing when I draw like this;

Method 2

Oh, and by the way, I have used exactly the same tools as in the last post minus the tracing paper. You don't need that.
Step 1. Get your Converse boot, or whatever it is you want to draw, and draw around it. Yes, actually put it on the page and draw around it. I've used pencil to get the initial shape in the drawing above. It'll never be true to shape, because it depends what angle you are coming from (in so many ways), but I like that.
Step 2. Then draw around the pencil outline with a ballpoint to give you a ballpoint outline (apologies for the totally bloody obviousness of what I'm saying). It doesn't matter if it differs from the pencil outline, it's your shoe and your drawing.


Step 3. Adding 'values'. I'd never actually heard this term before I started drawing-blogging. I think it might be a US term (?) or even a technical term. As I said in the last post, I've had no training so maybe that's why I'd never heard it before. So, for those, not in the know, like me, add some shading. By looking at your shoe you can see where the darker bits are - hatch there.




Step 4. More hatching. More more more. Continuing on from the last step, building it up and adding some texture.


Step 5. Adding more detail and continuing with the therapeutic cross hatching. Really feel those textures. Touch your boots!


Step 6. Finishing touches. Adding the lovely details and, again, for this drawing I've added a bold outline. If you don't want a bold outline leave it out. Not every drawing needs one. Finish when you want to finish. It's your drawing. Let the drawing tell you when it's done.

Well, that's the process I go through. But, hey, don't listen to me. I'm sure you have your own thing going on.

Check out THIS LINK to see the other method I use for drawing shoes.
Plus, you can buy my 'How To Draw...' zines, and other stuff, HERE.

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Saturday, July 24, 2010

how to draw a shoe

Over the past few years, of drawing shoes, I have worked through many different processes to get the end results that I am happy with. As I'm self taught it's been a process of elimination to find the ways that work best for me. I have narrowed it down to two methods, that I now employ, when it comes to drawing shoes from still life. I'll show you both in the next two posts.

You can see all of the tools I have used to make this drawing in the picture above. They are; a cartridge paper sketch book; tracing paper; pencil; rubber (I believe that means something different across the ocean!); three blue ballpoints; one red ballpoint. I want to stress at this point, because I'm asked so frequently, I use ANY kind of ballpoint pen. No special makes or brands. Any. As long as they aren't blotchy I'll use them.

Method 1
Step 1. I am pretty obsessive about getting the shape 'right', so if I'm sketching something, like an Adidas trainer, I will do the sketching stage on tracing paper. I realised, a while back, that I do not have any 'sketch' books as such. I only ever produce finished drawings. I do, however, have huge amounts of roughs, they are just on tracing paper. Doing things this way means I can work on the shape I want to achieve and then transfer it easily to paper. It also means that, if I should want to, I can reproduce the same image (in different mediums). Which is something I do quite often.
Step 2. When I've got shape I want I transfer it to paper. In the image above you can see the ballpoint outline. I would obviously start with a pencil outline, but the scan I did for that was rubbish - you couldn't see anything. So when the pencil outline is put down on the paper, I go over it faintly with a ballpoint.
Step 3. I have started to add some shading (values?) to some areas. I work out where this shading should be by observing the shoe and where the shadows and light fall. Excuse me if all this sounds really patronising, it's not meant to. It's just how I have learnt to draw. Step by step.
Step 4. Here comes the cross hatching. This is the part where I feel I can really get into the zone with this drawing. I love this bit. The shoe is starting to come alive, and more texture is being added through the hatching.
Step 5. A continuation of the last step. More building, more hatching, more texture. Also at this point I'm starting to add the detail. That's another bit I love doing.
Step 6. The finishing touches. My most favourite bit. Details, a bit of extra hatching and a splash of red. In this drawing the final finishing touch was to outline the shoe with a bolder line, using a ballpoint that has a bigger nib.

I'm sure there are more sophisticated methods of creating drawings but when you haven't had the training you don't get to learn them. That's OK with me, though. I found my way of doing things through practice.

Check out THIS LINK to see the other method I use to make my shoe drawings. Hope it's useful in some way.

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Wednesday, July 21, 2010

you're a rare rare find

Sir Wilfred Digby Jones McPickles

You know, I'd really love to have a dog. I would like a dog not for the companionship, or to get fit, I'd like a dog so that I could dress him up as a Victorian gentleman. Then I would get him to parade around the house with my cat, who would be dressed in crinolines. Just for my amusement. Until that time arrives I've drawn them.

The phrase 'what am I doing with my life?' comes to mind. Again.

Lady Flora Josephine Fossington Smythe

Actually, when I was away, a month or so ago, I was working on a book deadline. I'm not sure how much I can say about it yet, but as part of my research I found myself looking through lots of Victorian and Regency silhouettes. There are some stunningly beautiful examples, and I'd recommend doing a little research (Googling) yourself. I think you'll be inspired. I was. It's also how I'm trying to justify these two drawings.

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Monday, July 19, 2010

it's easy

This is a bit of a departure for me. I know it doesn't look like it, but it is.

Yes they are doodles. Yes it's drawn with a ballpoint. But, let me tell you, the urge to cross hatch the hell out of those doodles was eating me up inside. But, I resisted. Somehow, I resisted. Apart from a little LOVE.

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Sunday, July 18, 2010

rapping on the windows, whistling down the chimney pot

There's a new little post over on my children's book blog. Find out everything you need to know about the owner of this keyring HERE.

A new drawing on this blog will magically appear tomorrow. I think it's magic, anyway. Clicking on some magic buttons and then my drawings are whooshed all around the world (that's how the internet works in my mind). Now that's magic.

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Saturday, July 17, 2010

running over the same old ground....again

Look better like this, don't they?
Click on drawing to view.

In the last post I was considering giving up this kind of drawing. I will never give up the ballpoint, though. Never! I love it far too much. I don't understand why everybody doesn't draw in ballpoint. It's more the doodley style thing I was thinking of putting to bed. However, I do have an idea for them, and I need to get that out of my system first. And, it's a rather large idea. After which, you'll be as bored of these kind of drawings as I am.

Click HERE to see more of my ballpoint drawings.

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Friday, July 16, 2010

cold comfort for change

I have one final idea in mind for some of these ballpointy doodley drawings. I say final because I've been considering giving up on these kind of drawings in the near future. It's just a feeling I have.

It's not that I don't enjoy doing them. They are what happens when I play around with the pen and paper. When I want to draw but don't know what I want to draw.

And, it's not that I don't like these drawings. Sometimes I think they look pretty good. But, sometimes I feel totally uninspired when I look at them.

It's just that I get this feeling that these drawings are kind of like taking a step backwards. Or running over the same old ground.

And, I don't know that that is what I want to do now. I dunno.

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Tuesday, July 13, 2010

coming to take you away

I've been meaning to make this post for such a long time now. To announce the winner of the drawing below.

Now, you might remember my last competition draw (see it HERE). We roped in Wilf the dog, on the promise of a Bonio, to choose the winning name (WHAT am I doing with my life?). Since then I have been feeling the pressure to make this draw just as spectacular.

Has anyone ever tried to get a cat to do something that they don't want to do? Well, if you are attached to your face and don't, necessarily, want it to be removed from the rest of your body, I'd suggest you don't.

I tried. And, let me tell you, it was not a pretty sight. But I am getting over it. Once I'd mopped up the blood and put my eyes back in, I was able to retrieve the winning name. Unfortunately I was unable to get a photo of the actual draw. It was just too dangerous. And, was probably for the best.

So, the winner is Sara Blackthorne. The drawing is making it's way to you.

Thanks to everyone who purchased my little zine. For those of you who haven't yet got your copies of Molezines 1 and 2 (what is wrong with you?) they are currently available with FREE postage (for a short time only). So check this out, and don't be left out, you squares.

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Saturday, July 10, 2010

back to the garden

Now that I'm getting back into the swing of things I also want to get back to updating my children's book on a blog too. Unfortunately that's one of those things that gets pushed down the old priority list when time is short. That's OK though. I've been living with this book for the best part of two decades, so it's not like I'm in any rush to get it finished. And, anyway, I kind of like it that way. It's having plenty of time to simmer whilst waiting for the right publishing deal to come along.

So, if you want an explanation for the rather strange drawing above then you'll have to tootle on over there. Enter the weird and, frankly, worrying world that's in my head by clicking HERE.

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Tuesday, July 06, 2010

what's new pussycat?

Here's a couple I resurrected from the Graveyard of Abandoned and Unfinished Drawings. It's funny how you see things differently with some time and distance between you. I resented both of these when I was working on them. I resented the time and energy I'd put into them, and I resented them not turning out as I'd wanted. Did somebody say I'm getting old? Ooooof.

You might like to click on the drawings to read all the nonsense that was going through my head when I was creating them. The top drawing is my response to the Everyday Matters Challenge No.49: draw your fridge. You can see more of my Everyday Matters responses HERE.

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Monday, July 05, 2010

all the pictures on the wall

So we've known each other for some time now, right? Well, I thought it might be proper for me to now introduce you to some of my relatives.

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Sunday, July 04, 2010

blowing off the dust

Right then, back to business.

A bit of a crappy drawing to come back with, I'll admit, but this is my commitment to a week of posting. A new post every single day. Although, I know that when I make that kind of statement the pressure gets too much for me. Perhaps I shouldn't mention it. No, I won't say a word. If you want to see new drawings, every day for a week, then you won't find them here.

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